Document Type: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW

Authors

1 Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Science, Tehran, Knee and Sport Medicine Education and Research Center, Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran

2 Knee and Sport Medicine Education and Research Center, Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran

3 Orthopedic Surgeon, Knee and Sport Medicine Research and Education Center, Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran

4 Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Knee and Sport Medicine Research and Education Center, Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran

5 Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Knee and Sport Medicine Education and Research Center, Milad Hospital, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

 
Background:
Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most frequent causes of anterior knee pain in adolescents and adults. This disorder can have a big effect on patients’ ability and quality of life and gait.
 
Methods:
This review included all articles published during 1990 to 2016. An extensive literature search was performed in databases of Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge using OR, AND, NOT between the selected keywords. Finally, 16 articles were selected from final evaluation.
Results:
In PFPS subjects, there was lower gait velocity, decreased cadence, and reduced knee extensor moment in the loading response and terminal stance, delayed peak rear foot eversion during gait and greater hip adduction compared to healthy subjects, while for hip rotation, there was controversy in studies.
Conclusion:
Changes in the walking patterns of PFPS subjects may be associated with the strategy used for the reduction of patellofemoral joint reaction force and pain.

Keywords

Main Subjects

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