General Orthopedics
1. Do Patient Preferences Influence Surgeon Recommendations for Treatment?

Lisanne J. H. Smits; Suzanne C. Wilkens; David Ring; Thierry G. Guitton; Neal C. Chen

Volume 7, Issue 2 , March and April 2019, , Pages 118-135

Abstract
  Background: When the best treatment option is uncertain, a patient’s preference based on personal values should bethe source of most variation in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Unexplained surgeon-to-surgeon variation intreatment for hand and upper extremity conditions suggests that ...  Read More

2. Assessment of Decisional Conflict about the Treatment of Trigger Finger, Comparing Patients and Physicians

Michiel G.J.S. Hageman; Anne Caroline Döring; Silke A. Spit; Thierry G. Guitton; David Ring; Science Of Variation group

Volume 4, Issue 4 , October 2016, , Pages 353-358

Abstract
    Background: As an early step in the development of a decision aid for idiopathic trigger finger (TF) we were interested in the level of decisional conflict experienced by patients and hand surgeons. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in decisional conflict between ...  Read More

3. Assessing Practitioners’ and Patients’ Needs Regarding Shared Decision-Making and Decision Aids

Michiel Hageman; Jeroen Bossen; Valentin Neuhaus; Chaitanya Mudgal; David Ring; Science Variation Group

Volume 4, Issue 2 , April 2016, , Pages 150-155

Abstract
         Background: As part of the process of developing a decision aid for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, we were interested in the level of ‘decisional conflict’ of hand surgeons and patients with CTS. This study addresses ...  Read More

4. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

Stéphanie J.E. Becker; Thierry G Guitton; David Ring

Volume 2, Issue 3 , September 2014, , Pages 192-198

Abstract
  Background:  The primary aim of this study was to determine predictors of missed research appointments in a prospective  andomized placebo injection-controlled trial with evaluations 1 to 3 and 5 to 8 months after enrollment.   Methods:  This study represents a secondary use ...  Read More